Buckner Barber School

Drug & Alcohol Prevention Policy

OFFICE RESPONSIBLE: FAO

LOCATION: STUDENT CATALOGUE AND WEBSITE

DOCUMENT LAST UPDATED:  JULY 1, 2013

POLICY AND PROCEDURE LAST UPDATED: JULY 1, 2014
 

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

Drug Policy

To ensure a DRUG-FREE school, all students/employees are given notice that the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession or use of a controlled substance is prohibited in the school. If a student/employee is found to be in non-compliance with this notice, said student/employee will be given a minimum of thirty (30) days suspension. Said student/employee will also be asked to attend a drug abuse program which must be approved by the school administrator.  A second violation can mean the immediate termination of said student/employee without recourse. This school is also a smoke free facility.

Note: If you have a drug or alcohol related problem, the school staff is always available to you.  We also have a list of organizations available to you should you need any help.

ANTI-DRUG ABUSE ACT CERTIFICATION

MARCH 18, 1989

The students understand that as a condition of eligibility to attend this school, and as a condition of eligibility to receive Financial Aid, he/she must remain drug free.  The student also understands that if he/ she does engage in the unlawful manufacturing, distribution, dispensation, or possession of a controlled substance during their enrollment, he/she will be dismissed from school and not be allowed to return until they can show proof of being drug free, and until he/she has met the School's requirements by the following:

A.   Attended an approved drug rehabilitation center.

B. Show proof of being drug free and/or alcohol free for thirty 30 days

The student has been informed of the penalties for the use of drugs.  The students have received written information on the Federal penalties and sanction for illegal possession of a controlled substance.  The students have received information on the use and effects of a controlled substance.

The student understands that if he/she needs help while attending school for the abuse of a controlled substance, they may go to the owner or director for help without recourse.  The school will assist the student in getting the counseling they need.

Notice of Federal Student Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Law Violations

Effective July 1, 2000, students are ineligible for Title IV federal financial aid funds if convicted of an offense involving the possession of an illegal substance that occurred during a period of enrollment for which the students were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans and/or work-study). The ineligibility period is:

• First Offense = 1 year

• Second Offense = 2 years

• Third Offense = Indefinite

For convictions involving sale of an illegal substance, the ineligibility period is:

• First Offense = 2 years

• Second Offense = Indefinite The Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended (HEA) suspends aid eligibility for students who have been convicted under federal or state law of the sale or possession of drugs, if the offense occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, and/or work-study). If you have a conviction(s) for these offenses, call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243)
 

EFFECTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE

Excessive alcohol consumption and the abuse of drugs are just plain dangerous. Alcohol and drug abuse can affect your health and your ability function and think, and women are negatively affected even more than men. Heavy drinkers and drug abusers are not only a danger to themselves, but to others -- on the highways, at home and in the workplace.

Health Effects of Alcohol

Almost every system in the body can be negatively affected by excessive or chronic alcohol consumption. Alcohol can cause cancer, liver disease, heart attacks and brain damage, to name a few. Because many alcoholics also smoke, the health risks are further compounded.

Health Effects of Drugs

Abusing illegal, prescription and over-the-counter drugs can negatively affect your health in many different ways. Even if it's considered "medicine," drugs can have dangerous side-effects if they are not taken as prescribed. Drug abuse can lead to gum disease, tooth loss, organ damage or failure, heart attack, stroke, over-dose, or even death.

State of Texas Penalties for Possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance.

How Texas Classifies CDS

Texas divides CDS into four “penalty groups” (and two sub-groups). Penalty Group 1 lists the most dangerous drugs, which have a high probability of abuse and addiction, and no recognized medical value. Groups 1-A, 2, 2-A, 3, and 4 decrease in dangerousness and probability of abuse, and increase in recognized medical uses.

If you've been arrested for illegal CDS possession, you'll need to consult the Texas Code that lists precisely which drugs fit into each group. Go to the statute (Tx. Health & Safety Code Ann. § 481-102, 481.1021, 481.103, 481.1031, 481.104, & 481.105) and find the substance you're charged with possessing -- it will be listed under one of the six groups. (To find these statutes using the above link, choose the Health and Safety Code, then Chapter 481, then Art./Sec. 481.102.)

Group 2-A encompasses marijuana and its derivatives, and is not covered in this article.

Penalties for Possessing CDS

It is illegal in Texas to possess CDS without a valid medical prescription. Penalties vary according to the type and amount of CDS involved in the violation.
Penalty group 1

Penalties vary according to the amount possessed. (Tx. Health & Safety Code Ann. § 481-115.)

·         Less than one gram—a fine of up to $10,000, at least 180 days in jail (and up to two years in prison), or both.

·         One gram or more, but less than four grams—a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to ten) years in prison, or both.

·         Four grams or more, but less than 200 grams—a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to 20) years in prison, or both.

·         200 grams or more, but less than 400 grams—a fine of up to $100,000, at least five (and up to 99) years in prison, or both

·         400 grams or more—a fine of up to $100,000, at least ten (and up to 99) years in prison, or both

Penalty group 1-A

Penalty group 1-A encompasses only lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Penalties vary according to the number of “abuse units” (dosage units) possessed. (Tx. Health & Safety Code Ann. § 481-1151.)

·         Fewer than 20 units— fine of up to $10,000, at least 180 days in jail (and up to two years in prison), or both.

·         20 or more units, but fewer than 80 units—a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to ten) years in prison, or both.

·         80 or more units, but fewer than 4,000 units—a fine of up to $10,000, at least five (and up to 20) years in prison, or both.

·         4,000 or more units—a fine of up to $250,000, at least 15 (and up to 99) years in prison, or both.

Penalty group 2

Penalties vary according to the amount possessed. (Tx. Health & Safety Code Ann. § 481-116.)

·         Less than one gram—a fine of up to $10,000, at least 180 days in jail (and up to two years in prison), or both.

·         One gram or more, but less than four grams—a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to ten) years in prison, or both.

·         Four grams or more, but less than 400 grams—a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to 20) years in prison, or both.

·         400 grams or more—a fine of up to $50,000, at least five (and up to 99) years in prison, or both.

Penalty group 3

Penalties vary according to the amount possessed. (Tx. Health & SafetyCode Ann. § 481-117.)

·         Less than 28 grams— a fine of up to $4,000, up to one year in jail, or both.

·         28 grams or more, but less than 200 grams— a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to ten) years in prison, or both.

·         200 grams or more, but less than 400 grams— a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to 20) years in prison, or both.

·         400 grams or more—a fine of up to $50,000, at least five (and up to 99) years in prison, or both.

Penalty group 4

Penalties vary according to the amount possessed. (Tx. Health & Safety Code Ann. § 481-118.)

·         Less than 28 grams— a fine of up to $2,000, up to 180 days in jail or both.

·         28 grams or more, but less than 200 grams— a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to ten) years in prison, or both.

·         200 grams or more, but less than 400 grams— a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to 20) years in prison, or both.

·         400 grams or more—a fine of up to $50,000, at least five (and up to 99) years in prison, or both.

Anhydrous Ammonia

It is illegal to possess or transport anhydrous ammonia in a container that is not designed or manufactured to hold or transport it; or to tamper with equipment made to hold or transport anhydrous ammonia. Penalties include a fine of up to $10,000, at least two (and up to ten) years in prison, or both.

Talk to an Attorney

your case, explain your options CDS possession convictions can incur harsh fines and long periods of incarceration. A local lawyer who practices CDS defense will review the facts of, and advise you of the possible consequences.


Federal Penalties for possession of a Controlled Dangerous Substance. See 21 USC 844(a).

The statute applies to marihuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, ecstasy, psychedelic mushrooms, LSD, and peyote, just as it does to prescribed medications such as oxycodone (OxyContin) and hyrdocodone (Vicodin). The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is responsible for regulating controlled substances. Read the DEA list of abused chemicals.

The penalty for possession of a controlled substance is up to one year imprisonment and a fine of at least $1,000 but no more than $100,000. It is a misdemeanor offense.

However, if the defendant has prior convictions for drug offenses under either state or federal law, then the offense is a felony with enhanced penalties.

With one prior conviction, the defendant must be sentenced to a minimum 15 days in prison, or a maximum of 2 years. The court must also impose a fine of at least $2,500 but not more than $250,000.

If you have lost federal student aid legibility due to a drug conviction you can regain eligibility if you pass two unannounced drug tests conducted by a drug rehabilitation program that complies with established by the U.S. Department of Education.


Drug and Alcohol Abuse Treatment/Counseling

Right Step Drug and Alcohol Abuse Treatment............................................... 888-995-1834

Dallas/Ft. Worth Central
2219 W. Euless Blvd.
Euless, Texas 76040

http://www.rightstep.com/locations/dallas-fort-worth-drug-rehab/#sthash.InvFNXRY.dpuf

Homeward Bound, Inc Drug and Alcohol Treatment......................................... 214-941-3500

Administrative Offices and Outpatient Services
315 Sunset Ave.
Dallas, TX 75208
 

Life Management Resources Drug and Alcohol Treatment............................... 972-985-7565

Plano Treatment Facility  
3131 Custer Rd., Suite 265
Plano, TX

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